Palomino Body

This is another quick and easy extended body. Illustrated is a version for the Palomino Midge. Omit stages 2 through 6 for a simple tapered body. You may not even want a tapered effect, in which case, just cut off a piece of ultra chenille or venille and you’re ready to go! If you go for no singe or taper, unless you feel the material sufficiently robust, just dab a drop of Dave’s Flexament at the loose end of the body for the sake of durability.

Tying instructions:

Left-handed sequence | Right-handed sequence
Stage 1 1. Firstly you need to cut a suitable length of ultra chenille or venille, at least a few inches. If you prefer, work the loose end straight off the card or skein.
Stage 2 2. While gripping the chenille in one hand, pinch the last 3 or 4 mm of the chenille between index finger and thumbnail. Pull away with index finger and thumbnail stripping fibers from the core.
Stage 3 3. These types of chenille are quite tough so this may take several attempts.
Stage 4 4. If you find this too difficult, lay the chenille aginst a tough flat surface and hold in down by the last 3-4mm with a good metal edge. I use a ‘disarmed’ blade, but a keen edged steel rule will work.
Stage 5 5. Pull the chenille away from the metal edge, being careful not to exert too much pressure with the metal edge so as to avoid severing the core.
Stage 6 6. Using either method, you should end up with something like this. Now moisten the exposed core.
Stage 7 7. Play the chenille over a gentle flame.
Stage 8 8. It may help develop the required taper, to roll the singed chenille between index finger and thumb.
Stage 9 9. After a little practice you should end up with something like this.
Stage 10 10. Use in dressing the Palomino Midge.

Depending on their flexibility, extended bodies, just like long streamer wings, have a tendency when casting, to wrap back around the bend of the hook. The length of the extended body should be set with this in mind.

Warning: When singeing materials with a flame, observe sensible fire precautions. Be careful not to burn yourself with the flame or set light to a table full of feathers! If you use a cigarette lighter as illustrated, remember, the wick or nozzle guard can easily overheat if the flame is maintained for too long.

Comments are closed.